Photography into Sculpture/The Evolving Photographic Object

September 10 - October 22, 2011
Installation of 'The Photographic Object 1970'
Le Consortium, Dijon, France
July 3 - September 28, 2013

NEWS

July 3 -September 28, 2013, The Photographic Object 1970, Le Consortium, Dijon, France

Forthcoming Summer/Fall 2014, "The Photographic Object 1970," edited by Mary Statzer, University of California Press, Berkeley, CA

Cherry and Martin's presentation of selected works from curator Peter Bunnell's 1970 touring exhibition, "Photography into Sculpture," wins the International Art Critics Association award for Best Show in a Commercial Gallery Nationally.

SELECTED PRESS

Baumann, Daniel. “Year in Review.” Frieze Magazine. No. 151 November-December 2012.

Holte, Michael Ned. "REVIEWS: Photography into Sculpture," Artforum, December 2011, p. 264-264.

Smith, Roberta. Excerpt from "A New Pin On the Art Map: The Sprawling Exhibitions of 'Pacific Standard Time' Show California's Abundance," New York Times, November 13, 2011, p. AR 1, 22-23.

Ollman, Leah. "Now picture it again," Los Angeles Times, September 16, 2011, p. D23.

While, Chris. "Photography into Sculpture," Critic's Picks, Artforum.com, October 6, 2011.

Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter. Excerpt from "L.A. Confidential: Pacific Standard Time in Los Angeles Galleries," Artnet.com, October 2011.

 

PAST EXHIBITIONS

The Evolving Photographic Object in the US and Canada 1964-1970 / Paris Photo  November 15-18, 2012

 

CHERRY AND MARTIN ORIGINAL PACIFIC STANDARD TIME PRESS RELEASE

June 2011, Los Angeles—Cherry and Martin will present select works from curator Peter Bunnellʼs landmark 1970 exhibition, Photography into Sculpture, at the gallery as a part of the Getty Museum citywide initiative, Pacific Standard Time.

The exhibition opens on September 10 and continues through October 22, 2011. An opening will be held on Saturday, September 10.

Photography into Sculpture stands as one of Peter Bunnellʼs great contributions to the history of photography. Described in the original wall text as “the first comprehensive survey of photographically formed images used in a sculptural or fully dimensional manner,” Photography into Sculpture brought together a cross-section of artists from across the United States and Canada. The show encapsulated the radical gestures of late 1960's photographic practice, both inside and outside the photo world. Los Angeles-based artists such as Robert Heinecken, Richard Jackson and Jerry McMillan were brought by Bunnell into a context with such remarkable figures as the Fluxus artist Robert Watts and early Vancouver photo-conceptualists Michael de Courcy and Jack Dale.

The exhibitionʼs legendary tour began at the Museum of Modern Art and continued on to The Krannert Art Museum, The Menil Collection, the Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art, the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Phoenix Art Museum, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and, finally, Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. The full artist list was: Ellen Brooks, Robert Brown, Carl Cheng, Darryl Curran, Jack Dale, Michael de Courcy, Karl Folsom, Andre Haluska, Robert Heinecken, Richard Jackson, Jerry McMillan, Bea Nettles, Ed O'Connell, James Pennuto, Joe Pirone, Douglas Prince, Dale Quarterman, Charles Roitz, Leslie Snyder, Michael Stone, Ted Victoria, Robert Watts, and Lynton Wells.

The majority of the original works from Photography into Sculpture will be on view at Cherry and Martin. Also included in the show will be a number of related artworks by the Photography into Sculpture artists from the same time period. Cherry and Martin has confirmed participation with most of the original artists except Karl Folsom, Ed OʼConnell, and Leslie Snyder. Any information as to their whereabouts would be deeply appreciated, as the gallery has thus far been unable to locate these three artists. Cherry and Martin will organize a catalog that will include a new interview with Peter Bunnell about Photography into Sculpture; new essays on the exhibition; new photography of the objects; and a selection of original source documents.

 

About Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945 – 1980
Pacific Standard Time is a collaboration of more than sixty cultural institutions across Southern California, coming together for six months beginning in October 2011 to tell the story of the birth of the Los Angeles art scene and how it became a major new force in the art world. Each institution will make its own contribution to this grand-scale story of artistic innovation and social change, told through a multitude of simultaneous exhibitions and programs. Exploring and celebrating the significance of the crucial post-World War II years through the tumultuous period of the 1960s and 70s, Pacific Standard Time encompasses developments from L.A. Pop to post-minimalism; from modernist architecture and design to multi-media installations; from the films of the African American L.A. Rebellion to the feminist activities of the Woman’s Building; from ceramics to Chicano performance art; and from Japanese American design to the pioneering work of artists’ collectives.

Initiated through $10 million in grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time involves cultural institutions of every size and character across Southern California, from Greater Los Angeles to San Diego and Santa Barbara to Palm Springs.

Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.